>>> Girls Jam #1/2018 am 28.04.2018 <<<

Welcome to Parkour-Vienna

Melde dich jetzt an, um Zugriff auf alle Funktionen zu erhalten. Einmal registriert und angemeldet, kannst du auf dieser Seite Beiträge schreiben und aktiv an der Community teilnehmen. 
Angemeldete Benutzer sehen diese Message nicht.


Auf der Suche nach freien Parkour-Trainings? => Forum-Meeting
Auf der Suche nach regelmäßigen Parkour-Kursen? => Parkour-Austria

TOM

On Coaching Parkour: Be What You Teach

We live in a strange world.

If you want to be a doctor, or a lawyer, or a shaper of people’s minds in a school, there are considerable and rigorous processes to go through to qualify to do those things – and rightly so, as such individuals are putting themselves in a position of responsibility and have a duty of care to the people who come to them for help.

So why, I ask, do we not think the same processes need be in place for coaches of physical disciplines?

‘But wait’, I hear you interject. ‘Personal trainers and sports coaches need to pass certifications too, don’t they?’

And yes, in some situations and for some activities they do indeed. Certifications and pieces of paper conferring grand titles and assurances of expertise abound. There are thousands of them. Tens of thousands. And almost any of them you can acquire in a couple of days and for a few hundred pounds.

Let’s be honest, most of these so-called certifications aren’t worth the paper they are written on in terms of actual educational value. They don’t assure expertise of any sort on behalf of the holder. They don’t tell you how good a coach someone is, they merely tell you how bad they aren’t. Minimum standard achieved. And that standard is often laughably, and dangerously, low.

As a professional coach of a highly physical discipline, I would argue that it is just as – if not more – important that those who put themselves in a position of authority regarding the development and safety of another’s physical well-being are as qualified as those who look after people’s financial or intellectual health. A sports coach can have just as much impact on a person’s life as an accountant, a doctor, a policeman or any other profession. If a personal trainer makes a mistake the student could be seriously hurt, or develop chronic injuries, or even be mentally scarred. Yet pretty much anyone can ‘qualify’ to be a personal trainer or gym instructor with a few weeks, some money and the ability to sit through some authorised ‘guided learning hours’.

Think about it. If you walked into a karate dojo and the teacher was wearing a brightly coloured belt that demonstrated he had achieved the minimum standard to pass his first or second rank in that art, had been training a few weeks, did some of his learning ‘online’ and never had his skills seriously tested, would you be happy putting your martial arts education in his hands? Or would you search until you found someone wearing a darker belt who had been training for years, fought often and devoted his life to the art?

The problem is that there is a disease now – a ‘certification sickness’ – that makes the afflicted believe that all he or she needs is a piece of paper to justify establishing himself or herself as a ‘teacher’ of physical development. Another symptom of this disease is the odd mentality that has the notion that just because he or she wants to be a coach of a physical discipline, that is somehow enough. It isn’t.

Certifications don’t qualify you to coach. Nor do passion or enthusiasm. Time, experience, knowledge, ability, expertise – these things qualify you. You may need the piece of paper too, to confirm to various arbitrary conventions and requirements put in place by your society’s lawmakers and regulating bodies, but please do not confuse that with capability. You wouldn’t think of setting yourself up as a doctor without years of training and study beforehand – yet every day people set themselves up as fitness trainers and physical coaches with the idea that a piece of paper can replace all that.

I’ve practised and taught many things throughout my life – but I’ve never even entertained the idea of teaching something until I’ve studied or practised it for several years, in as much depth as possible. To me, the very idea that one would attend a coaching certification course without ever having practised the activity in question is, well, insane. What sort of credibility would that person hope to have when presenting himself to others as a ‘coach’ or ‘teacher’?

Here’s my point: if you want to coach a physical discipline, or anything for that matter, your first step is to become bloody good at it. You have to BE what you want to teach. Yes, this will take years. Yes, this will require hardship, effort, sacrifice and intense study. That’s just the way it is. A good martial art school won’t just hand out its black belts. A good certification programme won’t let just anyone pay their money, sit on their ass through some lectures and walk out with the stamp of authority. A good programme will test you, it’ll have tough standards to achieve that demand evidence of the years of practice. If it doesn’t, walk out. Ditch it. A certification that allows you to pass without really testing your knowledge and skills isn’t worth having.

We’re proud of the ADAPT (Art du Deplacement And Parkour Teaching) certification. It’s accessible to all in the early stages, as any programme should be, so that those who want to coach can begin gaining experience as an assistant to a fully certified coach – but only as an assistant. The ADAPT level 1 does not qualify the holder to coach alone, ever. That’s what the level 2 is for, the full coach certification. And that’s not easy. We’ve been told by various authorities that it’s the toughest sports certification in Europe. It has around a 30% pass rate. It demands a lot from the candidates, it tests their skills, their strengths, their knowledge and their commitment. It’s not easy. People fail. It works. You won’t find an ADAPT level 2 coach on the planet who isn’t damn good at parkour as well as at coaching.

Because, of course, just being good at the discipline itself isn’t enough either. Coaching is a skill-set of its own and one that also requires intensive study, research and practise for an individual to become competent. Add that to the qualifying criteria. But a certification, even a good one, isn’t enough by itself. They’re necessary in the world we live in, and they can create a recognised standard and a benchmark for best practice – but that’s it. They will never tell you how good a teacher someone is.

It comes down to integrity, and honesty. Ask yourself, simply and directly, do you have enough skill, knowledge and experience to be guiding others properly? Coaching is a huge responsibility, so if the answer is no, don’t do it. Go train, learn, study, research – for as long as it takes for that answer to become a yes. Because a good coach can have a hugely positive impact on people’s lives; but a poor coach will, at best, waste people’s time and, at worst, deceive, delude and damage the people in their care.

Be what you teach. Look beyond the certification sickness and realise that it’s quality that qualifies you. Embody the principles, the values, the methods of your art. Live it so that you understand it, inside out. Make yourself an expert practitioner.

Then you’ll actually have something worth passing on.

 

 

http://danedwardesblog.com/2013/11/13/on-coaching-parkour-be-what-you-teach/

Dominik Simon, miriam! and martin like this

Share this post


Link to post

jo! dans blog steckt voller genialer artikel. und ich muss sagen er is eine der bemerkenswerstesten personen die ich bis jetz kennegelernt habe.

 

außerdem ist er mit seinen fast 40 jahren in einer wahnsinns körperlichen verfassung. ich hab ihn gemeinsam mit blane und seb foucan im parkour fitness kurs eine challenge machen sehen. 30-40-50 wobei die 40 in dem fall für 40 wallruns eine 3 meter hohe mauer hoch standen. der letzte versuch war bei dan genau so sauber und mega schnell wie der erste. sogar bei blane konnte ich ermüdungserscheinungen feststellen, nach blanes 20. wallrun mit climb up ist er etwas langsamer geworden etc. bei dan keine spur.

 

daneben trifft dan ziemlich schnell gute entscheidungen, ist flexibel bei problemlösungen, weiß immer was zu tun ist und ist ein ausgezeichneter redner. hört sich nach einer ziemlichen lobeshymne an aber ja. ich bin von dan beeindruckt und er inspiriert mich härter an mir zu arbeiten.

TOM and Dominik Simon like this

Share this post


Link to post

Die Überschrift ist sehr prägend, ein guter Slogan. Der Anfang stößt mir mehrmals auf. Es wird vieles Überspitzt dargestellt, bei aller Liebe zur Bewegung, wir sollten die Kirche im Dorf lassen.

 

Seine Frag "So why, I ask, do we not think the same processes [as for doctors, or lawyers] need be in place for coaches of physical disciplines?", warum Ärzte jahrelange Ausbildungen haben und Coaches nur ein paar Zetteln Papier brauchen?!?! Man sollte daran denken, dass wenn ein Arzt operiert, es um Leben und Tod geht. Wenn jemand einen Sportart coacht, dann geht es um ein Hobby. Ich denke hier liegt der RIESEN unterschied, warum die Anforderungen an die Ausbildung so unterschiedlich von Staat und Gesellschaft akzeptiert werden. Schließlich soll es auch noch die Möglichkeit offen lassen, coachen zu können, wenn man einfach ein Stück besser bist, als derjenige, der von dir lernen will. Oft ist dies auch die bessere Methode, da derjenige der erst vor kurzen vor den selben Problemen gestanden ist, wie jener der Lernen möchte, oft besseres Verständnis für die Bedürfnisse seines Schützling aufbringen kann, als wenn ein Vollprofi Anweisungen gibt.

 

"To me, the very idea that one would attend a coaching certification course without ever having practised the activity in question is, well, insane."

Die Leute die diesen Coach folgen, der selbst keine Erfahrung hat, sind selber schuld, und wenn sie offen bleiben, welche andere Angebote es gibt, werden sie sich schnell abwenden und einen anderen, qualifizierteren Coach aufsuchen. Da appelliere ich an die Vernunftbegabtheit des Gecoachten.

 

"Ask yourself, simply and directly, do you have enough skill, knowledge and experience to be guiding others properly?"

Wie bereits oben angeschnitten, ausreichend ist, dass der Lehrende ein paar Schritte weiter auf dem Weg der Entwicklung ist, als der Lernende, um zu führen. Es wird hier zu sehr von einem Idealbild ausgegangen, nämlich, dass der Coach ein Superhero ist. Aber gerade das ist NICHT nötig und schreckt ab! Hier geht wichtiges Potenzial verloren, wenn jeder denkt, er wäre nicht gut genug als coach, obwohl er selbst schon länger dabei ist. Lernen bedeutet ausprobieren, Fehler machen, neue Weg suchen, Fehler machen, wieder neue Methoden ausprobieren. Wenn man alles vorgekaut bekommt, wird man einen großen Teil des zu lernenden verpassen, weil der Coach so gut war, dass er darauf aufgepasst hat, dass sein Schützling am schnellsten Weg die Methoden lernt.

 

Doch kann es auch Leute geben, die selbst nicht perfekt in ihrer Tätigkeit sind und trotzdem ein gutes Gespür fürs coachen. Warum sollte so jemand nicht coachen? -> "if you want to coach a physical discipline, or anything for that matter, your first step is to become bloody good at it. You have to BE what you want to teach." Dann müssten bei Olympia als nicht die Athleten selbst antreten, sondern ihre Coaches?!

 

Oder liegt hier ein Missverständnis vor, was gut und bloody good bedeutet. dann sollte dies VORAB definiert werden, sonst beginnen Leute eine Debatte und reden aneinander vorbei! bloody good heißt für mich, wirklich einer der Besten, der Besten zu sein. So als könnte man an internationalen Wettkämpfen teilnehmen, aber die gibt es ja nicht im Parkour, also mit welchen Maßstab wird sonst gemessen?

Käthe likes this

Share this post


Link to post

Die Überschrift ist sehr prägend, ein guter Slogan. Der Anfang stößt mir mehrmals auf. Es wird vieles Überspitzt dargestellt, bei aller Liebe zur Bewegung, wir sollten die Kirche im Dorf lassen.

 

Seine Frag "So why, I ask, do we not think the same processes [as for doctors, or lawyers] need be in place for coaches of physical disciplines?", warum Ärzte jahrelange Ausbildungen haben und Coaches nur ein paar Zetteln Papier brauchen?!?! Man sollte daran denken, dass wenn ein Arzt operiert, es um Leben und Tod geht. Wenn jemand einen Sportart coacht, dann geht es um ein Hobby. Ich denke hier liegt der RIESEN unterschied, warum die Anforderungen an die Ausbildung so unterschiedlich von Staat und Gesellschaft akzeptiert werden. Schließlich soll es auch noch die Möglichkeit offen lassen, coachen zu können, wenn man einfach ein Stück besser bist, als derjenige, der von dir lernen will. Oft ist dies auch die bessere Methode, da derjenige der erst vor kurzen vor den selben Problemen gestanden ist, wie jener der Lernen möchte, oft besseres Verständnis für die Bedürfnisse seines Schützling aufbringen kann, als wenn ein Vollprofi Anweisungen gibt.

 

"To me, the very idea that one would attend a coaching certification course without ever having practised the activity in question is, well, insane."

Die Leute die diesen Coach folgen, der selbst keine Erfahrung hat, sind selber schuld, und wenn sie offen bleiben, welche andere Angebote es gibt, werden sie sich schnell abwenden und einen anderen, qualifizierteren Coach aufsuchen. Da appelliere ich an die Vernunftbegabtheit des Gecoachten.

 

"Ask yourself, simply and directly, do you have enough skill, knowledge and experience to be guiding others properly?"

Wie bereits oben angeschnitten, ausreichend ist, dass der Lehrende ein paar Schritte weiter auf dem Weg der Entwicklung ist, als der Lernende, um zu führen. Es wird hier zu sehr von einem Idealbild ausgegangen, nämlich, dass der Coach ein Superhero ist. Aber gerade das ist NICHT nötig und schreckt ab! Hier geht wichtiges Potenzial verloren, wenn jeder denkt, er wäre nicht gut genug als coach, obwohl er selbst schon länger dabei ist. Lernen bedeutet ausprobieren, Fehler machen, neue Weg suchen, Fehler machen, wieder neue Methoden ausprobieren. Wenn man alles vorgekaut bekommt, wird man einen großen Teil des zu lernenden verpassen, weil der Coach so gut war, dass er darauf aufgepasst hat, dass sein Schützling am schnellsten Weg die Methoden lernt.

 

Doch kann es auch Leute geben, die selbst nicht perfekt in ihrer Tätigkeit sind und trotzdem ein gutes Gespür fürs coachen. Warum sollte so jemand nicht coachen? -> "if you want to coach a physical discipline, or anything for that matter, your first step is to become bloody good at it. You have to BE what you want to teach." Dann müssten bei Olympia als nicht die Athleten selbst antreten, sondern ihre Coaches?!

 

Oder liegt hier ein Missverständnis vor, was gut und bloody good bedeutet. dann sollte dies VORAB definiert werden, sonst beginnen Leute eine Debatte und reden aneinander vorbei! bloody good heißt für mich, wirklich einer der Besten, der Besten zu sein. So als könnte man an internationalen Wettkämpfen teilnehmen, aber die gibt es ja nicht im Parkour, also mit welchen Maßstab wird sonst gemessen?

 

Coaches haben eine riesen-Verantwortung gegenüber Ihren "Schülern"... wenn hier falsches beigebracht wird, kann dies sogar üble gesundheitliche Auswirkungen für das restliche Leben bedeuten. Meine Erfahrung (und die von einigen anderen wohl auch) ist, dass unerfahrene so ziemlich alles "for granted" nehmen und 1:1 nachmachen, was Ihnen von Coaches gezeigt wird... wenn dies "falsch" ist und lange so ausgeübt wird, hat dies Auswirkungen auf den kompletten Körper... dem muss man sich einfach bewusst sein.

 

Nicht jeder (bezogen auf Coaches und Schüler) beschäftigen sich intensiv genug mit dem Körper/Physiologie/etc.

Es gibt eben auch jene, die das nicht als Hobby ausüben sondern full-time... 

Ich traue mir inzwischen zu, sagen zu können ob mir jemand "blödsinn" zeigt oder nicht (z.B. pseudo-lustige Aussagen - ala "Ihr müsst auf den Fersen landen, da ist der Körper am stabilsten")... viele jedoch würden dies so lange machen, bis Sie jemand mit besserem Know-How darauf hinweist bzw. erst wenn Sie sich schon ziemlich kaputt gemacht haben. Selbiges bei falschen Rollen, falschen sonstigen Landungen, usw.

Das schließt für mich nicht automatisch alle Leute aus, die kein Zertifikat in Händen halten... aber die Kern-Message finde ich schon ganz richtig.... da steckt viel viel viel Verantwortung dahinter, der man sich bewusst sein sollte.

Share this post


Link to post

@Kate:

Natürlich ist es teilweise sehr überspitzt dargestellt, aber ich glaube der Text soll eine Erinnerung daran sein, welch große Verantwortung man als Coach besitzt. Natürlich könnte man auf den gesunden Menschenverstand appellieren, aber bei jedem definiert sich dieser anders, da er stark von der jeweiligen Vorerfahrung abhängig ist und wenn man etwas neu anfängt, weiß man meistens wenig bis gar nichts darüber.

 

Auch glaube ich nicht daran, dass es darum geht in dem ganzen der Beste zu sein (Olympia usw.) Aber nicht desto trotz sollte eine Menge an Energie und Zeit ins eigene Training und in Coachingfähigkeiten gesteckt werden um sich auch stetig selbst zu verbessern. Wer aufhört selbst an sich zu arbeiten, wird einerseits verlernen sich in den zu coachenden hineinzuversetzen und auch wenig neues einbringen können auf die Dauern.

 

Und selbst wenn es im Endeffekt nur als ein Hobby gilt beim "Gecoachten". Jedes schlecht ausgeführte Hobby kann dem Körper einiges abverlangen und muss nicht immer nur zum Positiven führen :)

Share this post


Link to post

Tom, es stimmt schon in diesen Punkten stimme ich dir überein. Und ganz ganz gut ist der Schluss:

 

"It comes down to integrity, and honesty. Ask yourself, simply and directly, do you have enough skill, knowledge and experience to be guiding others properly? Coaching is a huge responsibility, so if the answer is no, don’t do it. Go train, learn, study, research – for as long as it takes for that answer to become a yes. Because a good coach can have a hugely positive impact on people’s lives; but a poor coach will, at best, waste people’s time and, at worst, deceive, delude and damage the people in their care."

 

ABER

 

 

"What sort of credibility would that person hope to have when presenting himself to others as a ‘coach’ or ‘teacher’? Here’s my point: if you want to coach a physical discipline, or anything for that matter, your first step is to become bloody good at it. You have to BE what you want to teach."

 

Was mir aufstößt sind Sätze wie folgende, die am Anfang über strapaziert werden und hier hacke ich mit meinen Punkten ein, dass man nicht selbst in der Disziplin perfekt sein muss um andere zu coachen, sondern ein natürliches Körpergefühl und die Fähigkeit der Empathie wichtige Kriterien sind, wenn es darum geht, Bewegungsformen zu vermitteln. Warum muss einer Super weite Präzis können, Saltos, in der Höhe mental stark sein, wenn es um das anlehren von Anfängern geht. Bloody good, wäre für mich Daniel Ilabaca, und das sind wir alle nicht und trotzdem trauen wir uns zu unser Wissen weiter zu geben.

 

 

 

Es gibt eben auch jene, die das nicht als Hobby ausüben sondern full-time...

Es geht darum, wie die Gesellschaft, das Lehren von Sportarten sieht. Und Sport ist für 99% ein Hobby, nur die aller aller aller Besten, werden schaffen ihre Leidenschaft zum Beruf zu machen. Die Tätigkeit des Trainers wird Größtenteils ehrenamtlich ausgeübt, daher, warum soll der Staat darauf bedacht sein, eine Couchausbildung mit 10 Jahren Lehrausbildung zu verlangen, wie es im Beruf des Anwalts oder Arzt nötig ist, um als Coach zu fungieren.

Share this post


Link to post

Ich glaub Sätze wie "You have to BE what you want to teach", zielen darauf ab, dass du dich schon sehr stark mit dem Trainingsprozess an sich auseinander gesetzt hast. Es reicht einfach nicht sich für ein Wochenende in eine Fortbildung hinein zu setzen, dort zum ersten Mal mit dem Thema zu tun zu haben, das ganze dann nie wieder selbst anzuwenden und dann sofort ans coachen los zu gehen, nur weil dus jetzt darfst.

Das ist das was ich hier verstanden hätte. Du musst dich einfach so gut wie möglich damit auseinander setzten und hartes Training hineinstecken, sonst kannst du dich niemals in deine Schüler hineinversetzen.

Ich weiß dich stören jetzt gerade die Begriffe bloody good und have to be want you teach. Aber es geht hier nicht darum der aller Beste im Weitspringen, Hochklettern, Schnell laufen zu sein. Aber du musst zumindest so gut sein, sodass du verstehst was alles dahinter steckt. Vorbereitung, Training, Emotion, Motivation, und vieles mehr. Das alles kann nicht berücksichtigt werden, wenn dieser Prozess nicht schon selbst durchgespielt wurde.

Und ich glaub auch nicht, dass er jetzt an eine 10 Jährige Ausbildung appelliert. Es geht darum Verantwortung bewusst zu machen für das was man als Coach leistet.

kate likes this

Share this post


Link to post

Vielleicht auch interessant zu sehen dieses Interview von Dan. Werden auch ein paar coaching Themen angesprochen, aber auch ein paar interessante Themen wie Angst, Risiko usw.

 

Share this post


Link to post

Ein guter Traceur hat schon einmal bewiesen, dass seine Trainingsmethoden erfolgreich sind. Sonst wäre er selber nicht auf entsprechendem Niveau.

Egal wie gut man in Empathie und Liebe is, wenn man jemandem etwas beibringt, das man selber nicht beherrscht, verliert man an Glaubwürdigkeit. Heíßt nicht, dass man es der Person nicht genauso gut oder besser beibringen kann, als jemand ders beherrscht, aber schlecht erklärt. Heißt die Glaubwürdigkeit leidet!

Außerdem kann dir jemand der weitere und größere Sprünge schon gemacht hat, am Anfang gleich ein Verständnis für zukünftige Sprünge geben. Bsp. "Den Prezi stehts zwar mit deiner Technik, aber wenns weiter is und du bissl drop hast, stirbst!"

Also das mit Olympiaathleten halt ich für ein blödes Argument. Wennst die Wahl hast zwischen nem Olympiaathleten und irgendwem. Wen nimmst? Erschließt sich aus dem Argument ganz oben.

Außerdem hinkt der Vergleich beträchtlich, weil wir in ähnlichem Alter sind wie die Leute denen wirs beibringen. In 30 Jahren schauts dann genauso aus wie in anderen Sportarten. Weil vlt könnten die Trainer, wenn sie noch jünger wären genauso in den Bewerben mitmachen!^^

Share this post


Link to post

Ein guter Traceur hat schon einmal bewiesen, dass seine Trainingsmethoden erfolgreich sind. Sonst wäre er selber nicht auf entsprechendem Niveau.

Egal wie gut man in Empathie und Liebe is, wenn man jemandem etwas beibringt, das man selber nicht beherrscht, verliert man an Glaubwürdigkeit. Heíßt nicht, dass man es der Person nicht genauso gut oder besser beibringen kann, als jemand ders beherrscht, aber schlecht erklärt. Heißt die Glaubwürdigkeit leidet!

 

Danke fürs einbringen der Glaubwürdigkeit.

Wer schon mal gecoacht hat kennt die Situation, dass ein beeindruckender Sprung die Aufmerksamkeit der Trainierenden kurz bannen kann. Durchaus ein gutes Mittel um einen Einstieg zu schaffen.

Super trainierte Frauen und Männer sind von vorne weg glaubwürdige "gute Coaches", egal wie gut sie wirklich sind - da feuert das Unterbewusstsein los, noch bevor der erste Gedanke gefasst wurde.

Otto Baric (die jüngeren im Forum kennen ihn vielleicht noch ;-) ist für mich ein gutes Beispiel dass das nicht stimmen muss. Selbst schon ziemlich kugelrund war er eine zeitlang der erfolgreichste österreichische Trainer, auch wenn er selbst nicht mehr nach viel Sport ausgesehen hat.

Nicht den Bonus der beeindruckenden Sprünge, Backflips und super definierten Arme zu haben macht es manchmal mühsamer und der Weg trotzdem ernst genommen zu werden kann länger sein. Wenn die Hürde mal überwunden ist und die gecoachten Vertrauen haben und sich auf den Prozess einladen, werden solche spektakulären Sachen unwichtiger.

 

 

Ich kenn ein paar Leute die das Snowboard Nationalteam in Ö gecoacht haben - alles super Boarder, aber gegen ihre Athletinnen hätten sie das Rennen wahrscheinlich verloren. Gute Coaches sind für mich Wegbegleiter, die helfen schlummernde Potentiale zu entfalten - gegebenenfalls auch über ihr eigenes Können hinaus.

 

Was ist ein guter Coach für MICH?

Ich denke diese Frage spielt auch stark mit, wie die eigene Coachingrolle angelegt wird und welche Erfahrungen man selbst an einen Coach stellt - und diese Antworten sind glaub ich sehr unterschiedlich.

 

Meine persönliche Idealvorstellung eines Parkourcoaches ist nicht jemand der alles ein wenig (oder viel ;-) besser kann als ich und mich an der hand nimmt und dorthin führt, sondern jemand der/die mich begleitet mein eigenes Potential (physisch/psychisch/kreativ) zu entfalten und mich dabei stärkt Eigenverantwortung und eine eigenständige Parkour-Praxis aufzubauen.

Dominik Simon, miriam! and TOM like this

Share this post


Link to post

Jeder von uns hat hier seinen eigenen Standpunkt, in einigen Punkten gibt es Überschneidungen, andere Ansichten sind widersprüchlich.

 

Bei eine sehr widersprüchliche Ansicht, würde mich noch euren Zugang interessieren:

 

Wie passen Sätze von Dan (Danke Dominik für das Video) „Callenge yourself as a human. What can you do as a human“ … das klingt für mich, so als ob du jedes Mal, wenn du z.b. Laufen gehst, deine Spitzenzeit laufen sollst. Jedes Mal wenn du Parkour machst, ans Limit gehen sollst … Da stellt sich mir die Frage: Erschöpfst du deinen Körper nicht komplett, wenn du jedes Mal von Ihm die Höchstleistung erwartest? Wenn du jedes Mal bis ans Limit gehst? Wo bleibst da der Spaß? Wird er für den Erfolg geopfert?

 

Andererseits sind mir noch Martins und Michies Worte im Kopf: „Nur weil du etwas kannst, heißt es nicht, dass du es machen musst“ (Nur weil du diesen weiten Sprung kannst, heißt es nicht, dass du ihn springen musst) Ja, hier stellt sich wieder die Frage, warum nicht? Warum nicht alles geben? Wenn du es kannst, warum solltest du es nicht auch tun, wovor Angst haben?

Share this post


Link to post

Für mich beinhaltet die Aussage folgenden Input:

Wenn man sich immer innerhalb seiner Komfort-Zone bewegt, wird man sich nie weiter verbessern.

 

Man muss seine Limits finden und und Diese erweitern...sonst wird man immer auf der Stelle treten und keine Entwicklung erfahren. Dies innerhalb einer (für Körper und Geist) gesunden Manier zu tun, obliegt jedem selbst... somit auch das eigene Tempo des Fortschritts zu finden.

 

Das heisst für mich nicht jedes Mal... sondern jedes Mal wenn ich mich dazu bereit (gut/wohl) fühle... aber auch einmal, wenn ich mich nicht danach fühle (wie gesagt, innerhalb dieser wichtigen Kriterien - soll sich ja keiner kaputt machen). Ich habe zum Beispiel viel bei Training mit "schlechter" Witterung gelernt... am Anfang des Trainings dachte ich mir "der Stangenpräzi geht heute fix nicht" und am Ende des Trainings habe ich Ihn mehrfach hin und zurück gestanden.

Mir macht das Spaß und es ist für mich ein persönlicher Erfolg... und das ist nur ein kleines Beispiel von Vielen.

 

Also für mich widersprechen sich die Aussagen nicht wirklich.... ich denke hier geht es ein wenig um die individuelle Interpretation

toktok, Dominik Simon and kate like this

Share this post


Link to post
Wie passen Sätze von Dan (Danke Dominik für das Video) „Callenge yourself as a human. What can you do as a human“ … das klingt für mich, so als ob du jedes Mal, wenn du z.b. Laufen gehst, deine Spitzenzeit laufen sollst. Jedes Mal wenn du Parkour machst, ans Limit gehen sollst … Da stellt sich mir die Frage: Erschöpfst du deinen Körper nicht komplett, wenn du jedes Mal von Ihm die Höchstleistung erwartest? Wenn du jedes Mal bis ans Limit gehst? Wo bleibst da der Spaß? Wird er für den Erfolg geopfert?

 

Andererseits sind mir noch Martins und Michies Worte im Kopf: „Nur weil du etwas kannst, heißt es nicht, dass du es machen musst“ (Nur weil du diesen weiten Sprung kannst, heißt es nicht, dass du ihn springen musst) Ja, hier stellt sich wieder die Frage, warum nicht? Warum nicht alles geben? Wenn du es kannst, warum solltest du es nicht auch tun, wovor Angst haben?

 

TOM hat das imo sehr gut schon auf den Punkt gebracht. Man kann keine Regeln aufstellen die allgemein und immer gültig sind.

 

„Challenge yourself as a human. What can you do as a human“ » sagt ja nicht aus dass man es IMMER machen muss. Aber wie oft challenged sich der Durchschnittsbürger? Wie oft geht er an die Grenze?

 

Warum man manche Sprünge nicht macht, obwohl man sie kann - lässt sich vermutlich genau so wenig allgemein beantworten. Man könnte auch die Gegenfrage stellen: Warum sollte ich einen Sprung machen wenn ich doch schon weiß dass ich ihn kann?

 

 

Sehr spannend finde ich die Frage was "bloddy good" ist. Die Weite eines Sprungs sagt wenig aus.... z.B. Wolf Renaissance ist meiner Meinung nach ein sehr guter Traceur (zumindest wie es in Videos wirkt - ich habe ihn noch nicht persönlich getroffen). Verglichen mit einem 1.80m großen Menschen, springt er vermutlich aber nicht sonderlich weit. Jemand der  "bloddy good" ist, muss er meiner Meinung nach viel Wissen und auch Praxis zu der Thematik haben. Wie viel ist viel? Das ist subjektiv und relativ. Wenn man mich fragt ob jemand gut im Tische bauen ist sage ich vermutlich schneller ja, als ein Tischler.

 

Ich stelle unterschiedliche Maßstäbe an jemanden der:

 

 - die Tätigkeit für gewöhnlich gar nicht ausführt.

 - der die Tätigkeit als Hobby macht.

 - der die Tätigkeit nebenher noch macht.

 - der die Tätigkeit Vollzeit / Hauptberuflich macht.

 - etc.

 

Die Coaches die in dem Artikel gemeint sind fallen meiner Meinung nach in die letzte Kategorie, somit ist der Maßstab sehr hoch. 

 

Ich stimme aber auf alle Fälle zu dass man auch viel von Leuten lernen kann die auf dem gleichen oder noch niederen Level sind (wobei man nicht wirklich sagen kann wie gut jemand ist, da das von Mensch zu Mensch nochmal sehr unterschiedlich ist).

Share this post


Link to post

(...)Wer schon mal gecoacht hat kennt die Situation, dass ein beeindruckender Sprung die Aufmerksamkeit der Trainierenden kurz bannen kann. Durchaus ein gutes Mittel um einen Einstieg zu schaffen.

Super trainierte Frauen und Männer sind von vorne weg glaubwürdige "gute Coaches", egal wie gut sie wirklich sind - da feuert das Unterbewusstsein los, noch bevor der erste Gedanke gefasst wurde.

Otto Baric (die jüngeren im Forum kennen ihn vielleicht noch ;-) ist für mich ein gutes Beispiel dass das nicht stimmen muss. Selbst schon ziemlich kugelrund war er eine zeitlang der erfolgreichste österreichische Trainer, auch wenn er selbst nicht mehr nach viel Sport ausgesehen hat.

Nicht den Bonus der beeindruckenden Sprünge, Backflips und super definierten Arme zu haben macht es manchmal mühsamer und der Weg trotzdem ernst genommen zu werden kann länger sein. Wenn die Hürde mal überwunden ist und die gecoachten Vertrauen haben und sich auf den Prozess einladen, werden solche spektakulären Sachen unwichtiger

(...)

Weil Du den Otto Baric als Beispiel gebracht hast, muss ich eine Story vom legendären Ernst Happel einwerfen ;)

 

Manfred Kaltz : Als Happel im Sommer 1981 kam versammelte er die Mannschaft um sich, stellte er sich nur kurz vor und ließ den langen Horst Hrubesch ne leere Cola-Büchse oben auf das Lattenkreuz stellen. Er schnappte sich einen Ball, lief ohne zu zögern an und schoss die Pille aus 20 m Entfernung runter.

Nachmachen, sagte er nur. Wir lachten darüber. Aber der einzige, der es ihm nachmachte, war Franz Beckenbauer, alle anderen hatten ein paar vergebliche Versuche. Die Techniker waren natürlich im Vorteil, aber wir hatten auch einen Ditmar Jacobs, der sich abmühte. Happel ließ sich die Büchse noch mal auflegen um dem Ditmar die richtige Schußtechnik zu zeigen, und er schoss das Ding wieder im ersten Versuch runter. Wir schauten ganz schön blöd daher.

Das war seine Art uns zu zeigen, daß man ihm nichts vormachen konnte. Damit gewann er schon am ersten Tag Autorität und Respekt. Von sogenannten Streicheleinheiten hielt er nicht viel. Er sagte dann immer: dafür müsst ihr zur Mama gehen. Sein trockener Humor lockerte immer wieder das Training auf. Wir wären für ihn durchs Feuer gegangen. Als er 1992 in Österreich starb, waren wir alle wirklich sehr betroffen.

Legendär waren Happels Pressekonferenzen nach Bundesligaspielen, in denen er ein Zwanzig-Sekunden Statement in dem ihm eigenen wienerisch-flämischen Kauderwelsch absonderte und entschwand. Schreiben's was wolln, is mir eh wurscht. Ein anderes Mal sagte er Is ja soweiso alles für ***** und Friederich.

martin likes this

Share this post


Link to post

Jeder von uns hat hier seinen eigenen Standpunkt, in einigen Punkten gibt es Überschneidungen, andere Ansichten sind widersprüchlich.

 

Bei eine sehr widersprüchliche Ansicht, würde mich noch euren Zugang interessieren:

 

Wie passen Sätze von Dan (Danke Dominik für das Video) „Callenge yourself as a human. What can you do as a human“ … das klingt für mich, so als ob du jedes Mal, wenn du z.b. Laufen gehst, deine Spitzenzeit laufen sollst. Jedes Mal wenn du Parkour machst, ans Limit gehen sollst … Da stellt sich mir die Frage: Erschöpfst du deinen Körper nicht komplett, wenn du jedes Mal von Ihm die Höchstleistung erwartest? Wenn du jedes Mal bis ans Limit gehst? Wo bleibst da der Spaß? Wird er für den Erfolg geopfert?

 

Andererseits sind mir noch Martins und Michies Worte im Kopf: „Nur weil du etwas kannst, heißt es nicht, dass du es machen musst“ (Nur weil du diesen weiten Sprung kannst, heißt es nicht, dass du ihn springen musst) Ja, hier stellt sich wieder die Frage, warum nicht? Warum nicht alles geben? Wenn du es kannst, warum solltest du es nicht auch tun, wovor Angst haben?

 

Ich halt es für wichtig Können nicht mit Müssen in Verbindung zu setzen. Die beiden Beispiele die du bringst sind für mich 2 Seiten einer Medaille.

Einerseits sich immer wieder bewusst und aus eigener Motivation heraus bis an die Grenzen zu fordern.

Andererseits auch "Nein" sagen zu können ohne sich dabei faul, schlecht, wertlos, etc. zu fühlen.

 

In Julie Angels Buch wird dazu eine Geschichte von Stephane Vigroux erzählt:

Sie war bei einem Werbefilmdreh dabei, bei dem er während der Drehpause woanders hingegangen ist um dort Sprünge zu machen weitaus schwieriger und gefährlicher waren als alles was er zugestimmt hat beim Dreh zu machen. (vgl. Angel: Cine Parkour S.198)

 

Beide Seiten - Herausforderung suchen & Herausforderungen sein lassen - halt ich für den Treibstoff zur Weiterentwicklung, solange sie sich in einer Balance miteinander befinden.

TOM likes this

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

Parkour-Vienna

Gegründet im Sommer 2004. Mit tausenden registrierten Mitgliedern im Forum, ist es die größte Parkour-Plattform Österreichs und ein Grundstein der österreichischen Community.